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Retirement Options
RoyBoom
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2010 9:41:17 AM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 3/3/2007
Posts: 0
Location: Mechanicsburg, OH
Well, here I am well into my first year of retirement. I wasn't ready to go but was laid off last January and the shop was closed down and auctioned off. I envy you guys that are still at it, I'm missing it. I went back to school and picked up my principal certification because I heard there were shortages there, but apparently the schools don't know that. I get letter back saying they had 40, 80, even over 110 applicants for positions.

If there was one good thing about the lay off it was that I was on the good side of retirement. I'd bought in an additional 5 years which I'd finished paying for in the last year, so I was able to go out with 35 years. Now they just send me a check every month, but I really do miss working with those guys, even the ones that just drive you crazy.

Next week we're closing on a house in Ohio between Columbus and Dayton. It's a foreclosure that needs a lot of work, so that will be my job for the next year. I'm going to keep working on looking for a job, but I think the schools in Ohio are in about as bad of shape as the ones in Michigan are.

Bobber
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2010 11:07:46 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 3/27/2009
Posts: 0
Location: The Great White North
Good luck with the retirement. I thank my lucky stars that I'm teaching shop in Alberta, Canada. My budget is still healthy, for now!
Robert Renick
Posted: Wednesday, October 20, 2010 11:09:59 AM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 8/13/2010
Posts: 0
Location: Mount Shasta Ca
Roy,
Congratulations on a tremendous career. A dream of mine is to have a small bunk house and a shop to do some wood shop camps. They can be when and for how long you like. I would like to do perhaps 2-3 parent child pairs for a 3 day weekend, or a 7-10 day stay could make something nice like a dresser or guitar.

Another thought, as shops close and public charter schools continue to grow, I think my situation will become more common, shopless teacher. I got many great suggestions for projects on another post, but class room projects may become more common. Good assembly type kits, with some drilling and measuring.
Enjoy the new life.
Rob
Jeffseiver
Posted: Wednesday, October 20, 2010 12:17:55 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 11/22/2007
Posts: 0
Location: Mission Viejo/Calif.
Hay, same thing happened to me but I only had 13 years in the system.
It costs too much to buy years here in california. I am moving into cadd drafting at the high school level and have several interviews at this time. if I land a job then I will probably coach sports and maybe offer an after school shop class for 1 or 2 hours once a week. I did land a partime job as a handy man for a national company and enjoy doing service work for businesses, but nothing compares to weekends off and holidays and summer too. Good Luck
PS I like that idea about a 3 day camp style work shop!!!
Jeffseiver
Posted: Wednesday, October 20, 2010 12:21:22 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 11/22/2007
Posts: 0
Location: Mission Viejo/Calif.
Rob, Just for your info. On edjoin there are perhaps 4-5 shop teaching jobs posted right now in the bay area, if you can relocate. I would have applied for one but my wife wouldn't relocate. The closest to me right now is in Santa barbara ca. Up the coast but just out of commute range. good luck to you too.
Robert Renick
Posted: Wednesday, October 20, 2010 3:37:13 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 8/13/2010
Posts: 0
Location: Mount Shasta Ca
Jeff,
I did my professional woodworking in the Bay area, once one escapes to Mount Shasta from the Bay, there is no going back. Though it is frustrating to work without a shop part time, the perspective of how this craft is passed on within a classroom is valuable though challenging. My mind is enjoying the task of making a kit(s) interesting and challenging. As part of a rural community, this offers students something that is unavailable in our very small schools.

To tap into 35 years of experience, my questions would be about the very basics, which to me are a safety mindset, planning and order of operations, learning to not get frustrated and lengthen the student's attention span, and improve manual dexterity. We can't really do too much in a classroom, but hopefully I can get them to learn the thought process of how to complete something simple and use that process for real life challenges.
ssrjim
Posted: Thursday, October 21, 2010 12:01:22 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 3/13/2007
Posts: 0
Location: Phoenix Az
RoyBoom wrote:
Well, here I am well into my first year of retirement. I wasn't ready to go but was laid off last January and the shop was closed down and auctioned off. I envy you guys that are still at it, I'm missing it. I went back to school and picked up my principal certification because I heard there were shortages there, but apparently the schools don't know that. I get letter back saying they had 40, 80, even over 110 applicants for positions.

If there was one good thing about the lay off it was that I was on the good side of retirement. I'd bought in an additional 5 years which I'd finished paying for in the last year, so I was able to go out with 35 years. Now they just send me a check every month, but I really do miss working with those guys, even the ones that just drive you crazy.

Next week we're closing on a house in Ohio between Columbus and Dayton. It's a foreclosure that needs a lot of work, so that will be my job for the next year. I'm going to keep working on looking for a job, but I think the schools in Ohio are in about as bad of shape as the ones in Michigan are.



Your story sounds like mine. We closed the shop maybe 10 years back so the last few I've been the school librarian and technology coach. We didn't pass the override and they dropped librarians. 29 years in the district and out of work. I bought back the year I worked in another state so I could get my full 30 year retirement. So now I get a check the 1st of the month.

I've been subbing a couple days a week for a little extra spending money. Not really enjoying it.
Jeffseiver
Posted: Saturday, October 30, 2010 10:09:00 AM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 11/22/2007
Posts: 0
Location: Mission Viejo/Calif.
hey, news from the west, 40 miles a day one way and I am back working. Have to file the paperwork with the retirement folks and then putting in 5 more years. then I'll retire for good.
Giz
Posted: Saturday, October 30, 2010 10:52:55 PM
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Joined: 6/6/2006
Posts: 0
Jeffseiver wrote:
hey, news from the west, 40 miles a day one way and I am back working. Have to file the paperwork with the retirement folks and then putting in 5 more years. then I'll retire for good.


Good on ya! Keep the faith!
michaelknauf
Posted: Wednesday, November 03, 2010 3:01:06 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 1/17/2007
Posts: 0
Location: Hancock, NY
If any of you guys that want a part time teaching gig you should consider the world of summer camping, many of us are continually looking for qualified woodworking teachers, and summer camps are picking up some of the slack in teaching the arts that are being left behind by the school systems. I'd be happy to consider applications directly or pass contact along. I have contacts up and down the east coast, but there are summer camps all over the country.

michael@frenchwoods.com / www.frenchwoods.com
woodchips
Posted: Wednesday, November 03, 2010 10:58:38 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 8/5/2010
Posts: 0
Location: Southwest
Retirement for me is but a dream at this point. I'm actually new to teaching and I just happened to land my first teaching job as a woodshop and carpentry instructor. It's part time, but ever since I was fresh out of highschool 20+ years ago, all I have ever wanted to do is teach woodshop. I'm 43 years young so I'm a bit of a late starter however I can still do 20 years I'm sure of it.
The scary thing though is as hard as I've worked to get this position, and with the recent elections and budget cuts, I'm not sure my job will even be here next year. I'm on a mission to develop a curriculum that will support the program on it's own by turning the shop into a production facility for small woodcraft items on one side of the shop and in the big room having my carpentry students build and sell storage sheds and unique doghouses. I've got the space, I just need the blessings from the administration and for some unknown reason, they like the idea of shooting themselves in the foot. I can't get an answer no mater how hard I push. I'm going to keep pushing and pushing.............and pushing. I ran my own carpentry business for 16 years and I've laid out extensive business plans and ideas. The students are currently rebuilding the schools picnic tables and the grandstands which falls under maintenance and repair and I have to say I feel at this pint like I'm being taken advantage of as well as the students too, and I'm not too happy about that. There is only so many standards that can be taught while your repalcing 2x10x18 s over and over and drilling holes in them to mount on the frames. It's mind numbing work after a while. the kids are enjoying it, because they get to work with their hands and the tools, but there is so much more.
I'm preaching to the choir here, but there absolutely has to be a push for more vocational classes and instruction. It's shocking at how many kids in the 11th and 12 grade can't so much as even cut a board straight..........shocking. I'm not sying they all need to go into the trades, but as a former employer, there is a serious shortage of skilled labor.
How and where do we start?
RoyBoom
Posted: Saturday, November 06, 2010 10:00:01 AM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 3/3/2007
Posts: 0
Location: Mechanicsburg, OH
Woodchips, you've got to keep them happy so go ahead and fix the bleachers and picnic tables, but then just go ahead and do what you want in the shop. Build a shed and dog house and sell it, I bet they won't complain when you bring them the check. Maybe if they see you are getting some results with your method they'll start backing you more. Anytime I ever took an idea to my principal he always told me to go ahead, as long as it wasn't costing him money and it was safe. I did invest my own money in some projects, but it wasn't much and I felt that having kids involved and busy was worth it.
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