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Air Hose Article Options
MrsN
Posted: Wednesday, April 04, 2012 12:36:59 PM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 4/2/2008
Posts: 0
Location: Wisconsin
I have a couple of boys in one of my shop classes who were having too much "fun" with the air hose. (Needlessly blowing piles of dust, spraying themselves a little too close) They have lost air hose privileges for a while and I sat them down to discuss why making a large dust cloud out of a pile of swept dust is a bad thing. I used to have an article that explained some of the injuries that could result from serious miss-use of an air hose, I was going to make these boys read it, but I can't find it. I did some quick searching online and didn't find exactly what I had. (Although the school Internet is crazy restricted so it might be there and I can't get it here, but that is a rant for another time) Do any of you have any advise on where to find one, or have one you could share?
Thanks
Mrs.N
nielsenkNOSPAM@prescott.k12.wi.us
facarroll
Posted: Wednesday, April 04, 2012 4:47:02 PM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 4/7/2010
Posts: 0
Location: Ballarat, Australia
Try this link.
http://www.wst.tas.gov.au/safety_comply/dang_subs/compressed_air

Frank Carroll
Jindabyne Central School (Retired)
Australia
http://www.SafetyTestingOnline.com
klandin
Posted: Thursday, April 05, 2012 8:53:56 PM
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Joined: 6/1/2006
Posts: 0
Location: Connecticut
I have a really simple solution. Realizing that given the opportunity, adolescent boys are genetically incapable of resisting the urge to act like knuckleheads, I just don't ever let them use the air nozzle. Problem solved.

Giving an air nozzle to a teenage boy while instructing him not to do something stupid with it is akin to giving a dog a bone and instructing him not to chew.

Keith Landin
Woodshop instructor, Woodstock Academy
"Mens tua sit implementum acerrium in fabrica"
MrsN
Posted: Tuesday, April 10, 2012 12:21:24 PM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 4/2/2008
Posts: 0
Location: Wisconsin
Keith, I agree. In my middle school shop there are no are nozzles for kids to get. But I share my high school shop and don't have much control of anything that is in the shop. I removed them for a class period and didn't get a chance to put them back before the other guy's next class and was scolded for putting them away in the storage room. It is a touchy situation for me.
klandin
Posted: Tuesday, April 10, 2012 5:55:21 PM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 6/1/2006
Posts: 0
Location: Connecticut
Touchy indeed. Sharing another teacher's shop is always less than ideal. Since placing the nozzles out of temptation's way is apparently not an option, that leaves you with very few choices. If it were me I'd solve this by going "hard core". Starting on day one I'd make it clear that the students are not allowed to touch the air nozzle - period. Put it in the same category as a fire extinguisher, an eye wash station, or the teacher's desk. No warnings given, no "oh I forgot" accepted. Then wait until you catch your first victim, there's always one, and make a very public and memorable example of him. This is the sort of thing that works best when you start it on day one, so depending on how your marking periods run it may be too late to implement this right now but I'd certainly go for it next year.

Keith Landin
Woodshop instructor, Woodstock Academy
"Mens tua sit implementum acerrium in fabrica"
WoodTeacher
Posted: Tuesday, April 10, 2012 11:46:25 PM
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Joined: 2/27/2006
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MrsN -- for the class period you are in there it is your classroom and it is not unreasonable for you to remove the air hoseor or make other minor changes that makes your classroom management better. To be scolded by another teacher is not acceptable and needs to be reported to the administrator in charge.
Champlainbuilder
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2012 12:08:50 PM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 3/7/2012
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Location: Middlebury, Vermont
I'm a little sheepish about saying this but I can't believe I'm the only one who allows students to blow off at the end of a class. After 80 minutes in Woodshop, I'd be embarassed to let them walk around the school with all of that dust on them. I know I've been blowing myself off for years. I use the low pressure release nozzles and I don't allow them to blow off their projects as I can't stand fine dust in the air, but as for their clothes, I allow it. Do you all allow kids to leave full of dust? Do you just control dust better than me somehow? Do they vacuum off?

I give the safety lecture on screwing around with air, and they know I'll send them to the office if I catch them doing so. But isn't it just like useing a saw? Do it safely or you can't use it or you get sent out.
woodnfire
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2012 5:51:01 PM
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Joined: 4/16/2006
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Location: Bend, Oregon
In some states it is an OSHA violation to use compressed air for "personal" use
Champlainbuilder
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2012 8:22:13 PM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 3/7/2012
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Location: Middlebury, Vermont
Again, please let me know how your kids leave class. Are they dusty or clean? If they're dusty I'm thinking that this is not great for recruitment. I'm hopeing that someone gives me an easier way to clean them up at the end of a class, but blowing them off with compressed air is all I can come up with. Even now, with blowing them clean, I can follow the footprints down the hallways. I've been embarassed myself for leaving footprints on the carpeted floors in the main office. Sometimes we have to do what makes sense.
WoodTeacher
Posted: Thursday, April 12, 2012 11:36:00 PM
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Joined: 2/27/2006
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I allow my students to dust themselves off. I have a low pressure OSHA nozzle on the end. They know if they fool around the nozzle is removed and they go to the next class dusty.

As possible alternatives you could have them wear coveralls to protect clothing or get a number of clothing brushes to use.
MrsN
Posted: Monday, April 16, 2012 12:22:18 PM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 4/2/2008
Posts: 0
Location: Wisconsin
in my middle school I have a dust collection system that has extra ends not hooked up to machines. at the end of the hour a hose can be attached and then vacuum off the dust. A brush will work well to get most of the dust off kids most days, just the heavy sanding days that they get really dusty do they need more then that.
craigp
Posted: Monday, May 14, 2012 1:45:41 PM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 2/6/2008
Posts: 0
Location: Chesapeake City, Maryland
We had a ShopVac that the kids used to vacuum themselves off with.

Craig R. Patterson, CD
PLTW Teacher
Elkton High School
Elkton, Maryland
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