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mike
Posted: Tuesday, February 27, 2007 5:19:03 PM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 2/27/2007
Posts: 0
Location: gulfport ms
hi, my name is mike. im 21 years old and am currently enlisted in the united states navy in naval mobile construction battalion 1 (seabees). i took 4 years of woodshop in highschool and think that i might one day want to become a shop teacher. as of now im working toward a ba in construction management. now for the question, would the ba in construction management fill the requirements to be a shop teacher or is there anything else i must do? thanks for your time, take care
Dean_K
Posted: Tuesday, February 27, 2007 7:54:37 PM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 8/20/2006
Posts: 0
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Mike,

Welcome to California, land of the dumb and obsolete when it comes to Career Technical Education. Since you are not earning a BA in Industrial Technology, I am so sorry to tell you, that no, your construction degree does not qualify you to teach construction or anything else in anything but possibly community college. In order to teach in a public school and make a decent living at it you will need to earn a teaching credential. First though, you must show subject matter competency by passing a comprehensive technical exam in communications, production, transportation, etc. Then you can enroll in one of two programs at either Cal State Los Angeles or Cal State Fresno where you will spend about 3 years and no less than $10,000 listening to a bunch of ultra liberals who have never held a hammer in their hands or even taught a single high school class endlessly explain to you how messed up and racist white people are and how bad the education system is because of them. If you survive those three years including a ten week period of unpaid student teaching you will then be eligible for a job starting out at $40K, which just so happens to be the starting wage for a Title I clerk with no education in most districts. Congratulations, you could have had a law degree by now. But, for the time being, forget about the above outlined route and hope Arnold is able to change the process, which he is trying to do. Cal State Los Angles is a total looser school not even on par with a community college. Now the good news, there is this thing called a Designated Subjects Credential which authorizes you to teach 16 year olds and over and all you need to get one is verified work experience in the field you are applying for the credential in. Now, here is what you should do, and you are lucky I am here to tell you by the way, download the application for a designates subjects credential, fill it out and get it in your hand. Go over to Ventura High School and ask to speak with the principal about the woodshop job. With that credential in hand, you will probably be hired if the other teacher is ready to retire yet. If not, there are many other schools that will hire you without more than a 5 minute interview. What this route allows you to do is make more $$$ at the start of the teaching process without the huge stupid investment in the full on teaching credential from someplace like Cal State Ghetto. Get your foot in the door of teaching, see if you really like it, so much you can do it for 32 years or so and then if you really want to and the rules have not changed you can subject yourself to the sodomy that is earning a teaching credential in California, the worlds fifth largest economy and technological leader (thanks mostly to foreigners).
mike
Posted: Tuesday, February 27, 2007 9:13:32 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 2/27/2007
Posts: 0
Location: gulfport ms
thanks for the reply. unfortuneately i live in gulfport mississippi for the time being, not port hueneme. when i do get out of the navy i plan to head back up to the boston area. so my question is, are those state regs or do they go further?
Dean_K
Posted: Wednesday, February 28, 2007 9:56:19 AM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 8/20/2006
Posts: 0
Location: Los Angeles, CA
Those are state regs... THANK GOD
mike
Posted: Thursday, March 01, 2007 12:42:15 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 2/27/2007
Posts: 0
Location: gulfport ms
ill have to find out what is needed in massachusetts. take care
Mr2A
Posted: Sunday, March 04, 2007 7:37:21 PM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 3/4/2007
Posts: 0
Location: Amarillo, TX
It is good to see a young person want to teach, Wood Working or Industrial Arts these days. I thought that "Wood-Shop" Teachers were the Last of the Mohicans, so to say. I've been teaching Industrial Arts for the last 21 years and I've had such a great time in my career. it's hard to say where the years have gone by. I graduated from Colorado State U. with a degree in Industrial Sciences, learning to teach Metal Shop, Drafting and Wood-Working. it has served me well all of these years. I wish you the best, and wish you were coming to TX where we could use some good "Wood Shop" teachers.

"I'll see you on the Dark Side of the Moon"
ejaguar
Posted: Sunday, March 04, 2007 11:33:45 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 4/4/2006
Posts: 0
Location: Santa cruz, Ca
Don't get discouraged. The state education departments and the communities are beginning to realize the mistake closing the shop programs for the tech modules.
The problem is getting the money to finance the equiping of the new programs.
Our governer in California took trade classes in Austria and is pushing to reinstate the trade programs, and has given money to existing IA programs to update.

I have sold my skateboard items to over 500 schools and am amazed at how creative teachers have kept their programs going. Some states have tremendous programs, Utah, MO. MN.CO.MI.VT. WA. among others.

Bob M
ssrjim
Posted: Tuesday, March 13, 2007 7:01:33 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 3/13/2007
Posts: 0
Location: Phoenix Az
Mr2A wrote:
It is good to see a young person want to teach, Wood Working or Industrial Arts these days. I thought that "Wood-Shop" Teachers were the Last of the Mohicans, so to say. I've been teaching Industrial Arts for the last 21 years and I've had such a great time in my career. it's hard to say where the years have gone by. I graduated from Colorado State U. with a degree in Industrial Sciences, learning to teach Metal Shop, Drafting and Wood-Working. it has served me well all of these years. I wish you the best, and wish you were coming to TX where we could use some good "Wood Shop" teachers.


Do I know you??? I graduated from CSU in 1980 my name is Jim Lewis.
Joe Barry
Posted: Thursday, March 22, 2007 10:30:59 AM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member, Moderator

Joined: 6/1/2006
Posts: 0
Location: Randolph,Vermont
Twenty years ago when I taught in Massachusetts they were very exclusive about the difference between Vocational and Industrial Arts. With your Seabee experience as proof of trade experience you may want to follow the vocational route.That would would require the least amount of education in teaching and also provide more opportunity for jobs in construction trades programs. Check into what Fitchburg State offers these days.

Forget about getting dual certification in both Vocational and Industrial Arts. Massachusetts would not allow me to to hold both despite the New England Compact which allowed you to cross borders and get a similar license.

Joe Barry
michaelknauf
Posted: Tuesday, April 03, 2007 3:03:49 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 1/17/2007
Posts: 0
Location: Hancock, NY
Don't know if this will help or not, but I'm currently looking for a woodworking instructor to teach in a summer camp setting, if you're thinking of getting into teaching, working for a summer camp might give you a sense of what it's like, and the resume point might be helpful looking for a teaching job. Also, since many teachers still have summers off, working with a summer camp can give you an recurring gig to pick up some extra cash.

You can check out our website: www.frenchwoods.com for more info
Northwood
Posted: Monday, April 23, 2007 3:21:32 AM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 4/23/2007
Posts: 0
Location: Bakersfield,Ca
Mike,Good Luck !! I entered teaching the way dean recomended.After 24 years as a building Contractor in California i started teaching 10 years ago.I received my credential basicly from my state contractors licence.Then i had to complete 180 hours of classroom management course work to clear my credential.The teaching job is less money but makes for a better and stable life for my family.Go to the schools in the area you want to live and apply for the jobs.They will find a way to hire you if they need a teacher.Shop teachers are needed everywhere and most school districts will make it work.Good Luck.Mark
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