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Sanding belts-repair? Options
Dansilvernail
Posted: Friday, November 18, 2016 11:55:43 AM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 8/8/2012
Posts: 0
Location: West Linn, OR
I have a lot of sanding belts (3" x 24") that are "new" in the box. The word new is in parenthesis because they are actually quite old, and the glue or tape that holds these together is weak, rendering these belts useless. (No, it's not the sander or technique because I have no problems with new belts).

I have heard that there is a type of tape that can be used to shore up these joints. Is that correct? Or is there another way to fix these?

Thanks in advance.
klandin
Posted: Saturday, November 19, 2016 4:26:30 PM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 6/1/2006
Posts: 0
Location: Connecticut
I had the exact same problem a couple of months ago and nothing that I tried worked. Even gorilla tape had no effect. In the end I had to throw them all out and buy new ones. My take home lesson was that even good quality sanding belts expire sometime after twenty years - not so unreasonable really. If there is a fix I'd love to know about it.

Keith Landin
Woodshop instructor, Woodstock Academy
"Mens tua sit implementum acerrium in fabrica"
tbockman
Posted: Sunday, November 20, 2016 10:39:11 AM
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Joined: 11/17/2006
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It hasn't been often, but every once and a while I will have an overheated belt come apart on the tape line... leading me to believe it may be put together with a high temperature thermal set adhesive. The belt is usually well worn by the time this happens so I haven't tried repairing them. I'm not sure if old (past shelf life) belts can be repaired with heat or by any other available adhesive, but it would make an interesting experiment to at least try running a heat gun over the open seam to see what happens to the adhesive.
klandin
Posted: Sunday, November 20, 2016 1:33:06 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 6/1/2006
Posts: 0
Location: Connecticut
Tom, As I'm sure you know the primary source of belt heat is the friction generated where the sanding belt rubs against the steel platten between the front and rear rollers. I have found that replacing the OEM steel plattens on my belt sanders with graphite impregnated pads works wonders for reducing belt friction. This simple expedience significantly decreases heat build-up in the belt, thus extending belt life. It also takes a heck of a lot of the load off of the motor, thus extending the life of the tool. I have done this to all of my belt sanders both at school and at home. I would not dream of handing a belt sander to some ham handed student without first having swapped out the sander's OEM platten for a graphite impregnated pad.

Keith Landin
Woodshop instructor, Woodstock Academy
"Mens tua sit implementum acerrium in fabrica"
tbockman
Posted: Monday, November 21, 2016 8:26:22 AM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 11/17/2006
Posts: 0
I know.... and agree... that's a great idea, but now that I have younger students who don't use the belt sander, we don't have as much need at this school. On the other hand, when I was in the high school, I had those. I will say though, that there wasn't many times when a belt would let loose on the seam and the graphite pad didn't seem to make a difference. I can't remember ever wearing out a sander in 30 years. Except for the occasional student who would run over the cord... I had relatively few belt sander repairs.
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