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colleges with woodworking programs? Options
klandin
Posted: Wednesday, November 19, 2008 9:14:37 PM
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Joined: 6/1/2006
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Location: Connecticut
I've got a very talented student that I've been nurturing for the past few years. This kid is an absolute sponge. He's in my shop every free minute that he has sucking up every skill, technique, and piece of arcane knowledge that I share with him. The kid is talented and passionate about everything that is woodworking. In short he needs to persue this beyond high school. He's a junior now, and its time for him to begin thinking about college. I'd like to point him in the right direction but I really don't know where to begin. RISD has a good reputation, but they are very expensive. Also, I've seen their program and although its very strong on design, I found it kinda weak on nuts and bolts craftsmanship. The College of the Redwoods out in California leaps to mind, but something on this side of the continent would be an easier sell. Can anybody out there recomend any colleges on the East coast with strong woodworking programs?

Keith Landin
Woodshop instructor, Woodstock Academy
"Mens tua sit implementum acerrium in fabrica"
BRYAN CONKLIN
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2008 7:07:38 AM
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Joined: 11/6/2007
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Location: BOSTON, MA
You can try UMASS Dartmouth. They have a furniture design program.
There is a non traditional college in Boston called North Bennett st. school. They have a fine furniture making program as well and it is very known.
Try talking to you guidance dept. Tell them to put down the coffee and newspaper and have them do a search for the kid. There use to be a book put out by someone that listed majors and then listed every college that offered that major under the name of the major. I would like to think that this a staple in any guidance office but who knows............
creighta
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2008 7:26:01 AM
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Location: Georgetown/OH
Try calling local cabinetmakers unions. They usually offer apprenticeships that pay hime to learn instead of the other way around.

For something really interesting check out the Great Lakes Boat Building School. They do everything from boat design and construction to cabinet making.
mstang64bb
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2008 11:09:52 AM
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Location: Coventry, CT
Hi Keith,

Since we're both from CT. I went to CCSU. They have a good program. There is also Virgina Tech.



A project isn't finished, until a FINISH is on it....Bob~
klandin
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2008 11:28:21 AM
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Joined: 6/1/2006
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Location: Connecticut
Really guys. I said I was looking for a college with a strong woodworking program, not a college with a Tech Ed program. Soooo not the same thing!
North Bennet St. would seem like a fine option but I've been in touch with them before and they seem to only want "adult learners". Appearently they're really not geared towards recent High school grads. In fact they openly descouraged me from recomending their program to my students.
Thanks for the Dartmouth lead. I'll have to look into that.

Keith Landin
Woodshop instructor, Woodstock Academy
"Mens tua sit implementum acerrium in fabrica"
BRYAN CONKLIN
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2008 12:07:56 PM
Rank: Newbie
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Joined: 11/6/2007
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Location: BOSTON, MA
Keith,
I would also check the area of colleges for a furniture design program. This may open a few options as well. I think Suffolk, and mass college of art had some type of furniture program as well.

NBS in Boston can be seen as thinking that they are a little better then everyone else.
Many teachers I've spoken to try not to send thier better kids there as well b/c they teach you in a way that you would only be able to produce a few pcs a year.
axle5
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2008 1:39:43 PM
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Location: Pa
I went through a Tech Ed track and overall I'm HIGHLY disappointed with the education recieved. I am a self taught craftsman thanks to pressure from my father who was a carpenter for 32 years. Tech Ed is a good track to build a education that is only a inch deep, but if you want a sound education, get your hands into something more intensive. Just my opinion!!!!!
klandin
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2008 3:00:58 PM
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Location: Connecticut
Yep. That's kinda what I meant, but I didn't want to offend.

But since you've brought it up: Except for those few individuals with decent hands-on skills which they aquired elsewhere, most newbie graduates that I've run across can't tell a rip saw from a cross cut saw. The Ivory Towers just don't teach the hands-on stuff anymore. I've met many fine young teachers who are perfectly well prepared to teach in a dust free environment, but I've got to tell you, my high school students know more about woodworking than they do.

Keith Landin
Woodshop instructor, Woodstock Academy
"Mens tua sit implementum acerrium in fabrica"
mstang64bb
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2008 3:06:45 PM
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Joined: 8/21/2007
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Location: Coventry, CT
I am a second career teacher who happens to be proud of my so called "tech ed" degree. I agree that it may not be the best for concentrating on wood working skills, but I was just trying to help. I know some colleges are trying to bring back the "hands-on skills" within the course offerings.

A project isn't finished, until a FINISH is on it....Bob~
dtrenholm
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2008 3:35:53 PM
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Joined: 10/3/2008
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Location: Calgary/Canada
Being an ele4ctrician and an elementary generalist... on the job training was what I received. Lots of mistakes, lots of patience. Steep learning curve, reading and practice.

I started out teaching a warehousing program and was given a "sub trades program"... All else is history...I just a little bit smarter that the students.

Bottom line...yah gotta get your foot in the door... In Canada, that requires an education degree.
Buckiteacher
Posted: Thursday, November 20, 2008 9:45:45 PM
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Joined: 4/14/2008
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Location: Columbus, Ohio
Here in Ohio we have RIO GRANDE where Lonnie Bird once taught, I currently have two students attending. In Michigan there is Kendal College, he did well there.
atorrez
Posted: Friday, November 21, 2008 2:16:58 PM
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Joined: 11/30/2007
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Location: Commerce, CA
Hi Keith,

Check out www.woodindustryed.org and click on "search the database". You can search for a school by state, type of institution, type of program, or a combination of these and other criteria. This can provide basic contact and general information about the school/program, from there you or the student can perform further research.

Best of luck to you and your student!

Best Regards,

Adria Torrez
Assistant Education Director, AWFS
pwinchester
Posted: Sunday, November 23, 2008 5:11:32 PM
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Joined: 8/12/2008
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Location: Lecompton, KS
Can't let this one go without giving my alma mater some props!

Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, KS.

http://www.pittstate.edu/department/tech-studies/wood-technology/index.dot
klandin
Posted: Monday, November 24, 2008 12:09:42 PM
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Joined: 6/1/2006
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Location: Connecticut
Thanks for those last two posts. Both are very useful.



Keith Landin
Woodshop instructor, Woodstock Academy
"Mens tua sit implementum acerrium in fabrica"
Jeffseiver
Posted: Monday, November 24, 2008 11:38:12 PM
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Joined: 11/22/2007
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Location: Mission Viejo/Calif.
klandin, If he wants to go out os state check out CSULA in California or Fresno State in CAL. Both have great programs.
ggentry@tntech.edu
Posted: Tuesday, November 25, 2008 2:50:54 PM
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Joined: 11/25/2008
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Location: Smithville/TN
Try the Appalachian Center for Craft a division of Tennessee Technological University in Smithville, Tennessee. The Craft Center offers a BFA in woodworking and also offers certificates of completion. www.tntech.edu/craftcenter.
craigp
Posted: Tuesday, November 25, 2008 10:45:16 PM
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Joined: 2/6/2008
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Location: Chesapeake City, Maryland
You could also check out Fort Hays State in Hays, Kansas. They have a "tech ed" program, but also offer woodworking courses. Red Rocks Community College in Lakewood, Colorado has a woodworking program where you can receive certificates and work towards a master carpenter certificate.

Craig R. Patterson, CD
PLTW Teacher
Elkton High School
Elkton, Maryland
woodace
Posted: Thursday, December 04, 2008 4:05:40 PM
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Joined: 12/4/2008
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Location: Riddle,Oregon
HI Keith
I have been a furniture maker and contractor for 20 years and teach our community collage adult woodworking class. I have noticed all the best woodworkers seem to have attended North Bennett street school in Boston ,the have great programs check them out on line. That's were I would attend if I had it to do all over again.

Enjoy
Jim
Jack Grube
Posted: Thursday, December 04, 2008 6:13:03 PM
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Joined: 12/28/2005
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Location: New Hampshire
I live in the Boston area and am very familiar with NBSS. If you want to learn traditional woodworking techniques it offers a great education. However, it is not a college and rather expensive. One of my best students was accepted there and after consideration he decided to not attend.
klandin
Posted: Thursday, December 04, 2008 8:17:54 PM
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Joined: 6/1/2006
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Location: Connecticut
As I mentioned above I have contacted NBSS before this and I was all but told "sorry we're not interested in recent HS grads". They only seem to want adult students. They were EXTREMELY uninterested in soliciting my students. I practically had to beg them to send me a few brochures. All of which is a shame because they do have a fantastic reputation, and like woodace its how I would go if I had to do it all over again. Oh well. Their loss.

Keith Landin
Woodshop instructor, Woodstock Academy
"Mens tua sit implementum acerrium in fabrica"
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