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Running "business" out of shop (ramble) Options
Roger Peterson
Posted: Friday, February 06, 2009 2:00:58 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 3/1/2006
Posts: 0
Location: Mellen WI
Just a comment on Joe Barry's statement (in the canoe thread) about running a business out of the shop and admin not being supportive.

This day and age when most of us struggle to get the basic supplies we need to keep our programs afloat, it burns me to hear that admin would not support any additional income. My kids turn pens, make signs, tables, etc. and sell them to help bring in extra $$ for the shop. They typically take a percentage for their own pocket, but a lot of times they just put it back into the shop "company" fund.

We by our extra "toys" with this money that the school doesn't think is necessary. This year they wanted a dedicated miter saw with a laser line and top of the line blade $350+ that students worked for and bought. You want to see pride and a difference in how equipment is treated? Giving the kids ownership in the shop has been very effective as far as self-motivation, and respect for the facility.

It's too bad that some admin doesn't let programs profit from student work. If it is a legal situation you think they would be willing to help out to allow the program to fund itself.

Ramblin' Rog
Joe Barry
Posted: Friday, February 06, 2009 2:19:11 PM
Rank: Advanced Member
Groups: Member, Moderator

Joined: 6/1/2006
Posts: 0
Location: Randolph,Vermont
The real irony in my conversation with my "fearless leader" was that I was meeting a state requirement for a processes of industry class. I had the kids set up a "company", do all the planning, pricing, bidding, production, sale, and payoff of the "investors" (including their sweat equity) The superintendent said I could meet my educational goals without making a profit. Call me aa capitalist but, seeing how a business can make money is both the object of the lesson and one heck of a learning moment!
Jeffseiver
Posted: Sunday, February 08, 2009 12:14:25 AM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 11/22/2007
Posts: 0
Location: Mission Viejo/Calif.
Roger, if the money goe's into a school account for the wood shop then you are fund raising. Right. If it goe's into your pocket then your running a business. I once met a ws teacher who bought all the wood and tools. He had the kids build 1 project for them and the second one for him. He then took the project and sold it through a series of gift shops and specialty stores that he had recruited. he paid for everything including a cabin in the mountains Over the years. But he never turned in a dime and did not collect a shop fee.
So I guess we have to learn the old Texas two step so we can dance
with the bride. ifyou know what I mean.
joop
Posted: Monday, February 09, 2009 2:10:51 AM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 4/24/2008
Posts: 0
Location: Potchefstroom, South Africa
I must agree with Jeff.. fund raising and running a business are two different things. At my school the metal workshop teacher rents a empty storeroom on the school grounds from where he runs his own business, making security gates etc. The school charges for electricity (installed a meter), and floorspace. For him its much cheaper than getting a space somewhere else, and both parties are happy. Depends on your admin's attitude really.
creighta
Posted: Monday, February 09, 2009 10:52:39 AM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 1/16/2008
Posts: 0
Location: Georgetown/OH
I supply most of my kids lumber and I can't worry about having them make something for me personally. I can't imagine profiting from it.

As for buisiness-go to the board and explain it to them as a funraiser and they will love it.
Roger Peterson
Posted: Monday, February 09, 2009 4:07:52 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 3/1/2006
Posts: 0
Location: Mellen WI
All of the profits go back to our shop business (Black Granite Gifts). The kids get to decide what to buy with it. Some kids will even invest money into certain projects that other kids are making to get a percentage of the profits. The kids negotiate the percentages they each get and they usually give back about 10% back to the shop account for misc supplies.

I've never had any problem, in fact a lot of people look forward to our spring show when the kids begin selling projects. Small town, community is very supportive.
John F. Mason
Posted: Monday, February 16, 2009 11:56:41 PM
Rank: Newbie
Groups: Member

Joined: 9/16/2007
Posts: 0
Location: N. Hollywood, CA
I am active in SkillsUSA. We compete on a local level, Los Angeles, Orange County and Ventura. The best go to state to compete against the rest of the counties in California. The problem is when a kid wins a gold medal he goes to Fresno or wherever they have it that year and stays in a hotel. A lot of my students are poor, so it is a hardship staying in a hotel for three days. I fund raise before Christmas. We make reindeer, pens, desk knick knacks and whatever we can think of that will sell. I set up an account in the student bank and then usually have enough money so the student does not have to pay for the hotel. The students make the projects but sometimes get beind so I help make the deadline. Skills USA is a great organization to get involved with. I have sold left over projects to fellow teachers but put the money in the student bank so there is no questions.
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