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Profile: Doug Stowe
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User Name: Doug Stowe
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Location Arkansas
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Joined: Tuesday, February 21, 2006
Last Visit: Saturday, August 05, 2017 10:14:42 AM
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Last 10 Posts
Topic: box making in Connecitcut
Posted: Friday, July 28, 2017 7:24:58 PM
I have a box making class at the Connecticut Valley School of Woodworking August 7-12. It would be a great way to hone box making skills immediately prior to the start of the school year. You can read about the class here: https://www.schoolofwoodworking.com/class-schedule/37-week-long-classes/630-creative-box-making-with-doug-stowe.html

I expect it to be a small class (only five enrolled so far) so there will be lots of personal attention.

I plan to teach several styles and techniques of boxmaking, and present valuable information on 3-D design.

Thanks,

Doug Stowe
dougstowe.com
wisdomofhands.blogspot.com

Doug Stowe
Director Wisdom of the Hands at Clear Spring School
Author of books and articles for Taunton Press and Fine Woodworking
http://www.dougstowe.com
blogging at: http://wisdomofhands.blogspot.com
Topic: Making Classic Toys that Teach
Posted: Friday, November 11, 2016 5:12:28 PM
I have a new book out that members may find useful and of interest. I believe it is important to understand the philosophical foundation of woodworking education, and how many teachers these days know that it started with Kindergarten?

This flipbook Making Classic Toys that Teach will give readers a preview. The book is a mix of how-to woodworking, along with some history and philosophy that suggests the continued importance of woodworking education.

http://springhousepress.com/new-products/making-classic-toys-that-teach

very best,

Doug

Doug Stowe
Director Wisdom of the Hands at Clear Spring School
Author of books and articles for Taunton Press and Fine Woodworking
http://www.dougstowe.com
blogging at: http://wisdomofhands.blogspot.com
Topic: summer reading
Posted: Wednesday, June 08, 2016 2:36:19 PM
I have posted some summer reading to my blog, Wisdom of the Hands, at this link: https://wisdomofhands.blogspot.com/2016/06/summer-reading.html

I know that many shop teachers have very little time during the school year to read the kinds of materials that help us to share with others the value of what we do, particularly when it comes to the expansion of a child's intellect.

There is a body of research proving the value of hands on learning, that I hope shop teachers will find useful.
Summer reading...

Doug Stowe
Director Wisdom of the Hands at Clear Spring School
Author of books and articles for Taunton Press and Fine Woodworking
http://www.dougstowe.com
blogging at: http://wisdomofhands.blogspot.com
Topic: July 6th woodworking presentation in the Boston, MA area
Posted: Friday, July 06, 2012 3:08:59 PM
JoeNovack wrote:
I second that...
I'd love to have a copy if recorded...

All the best,
Joe


I'm not sure if it will be recorded, but I don't think there are plans for that. I realize anything I might say will be preaching to the choir, but I prefer to think of it as choir practice. We all need to get good at defending our programs where they still exist, or explaining the rationale for them where we might have the slightest chance of starting something new. Eliot School and the North Bennet St. School each have programs putting woodworking back in Boston Public Schools on a limited basis. And I am excited to see this bit of progress. It will also be fun for me to reconnect with friends.

I hope to see a few readers there. In the event you cannot attend, most of what I'll have to say can be read in my blog, though not all at the same time. , http://wisdomofhands.blogspot.com

Doug

Doug Stowe
Director Wisdom of the Hands at Clear Spring School
Author of books and articles for Taunton Press and Fine Woodworking
http://www.dougstowe.com
blogging at: http://wisdomofhands.blogspot.com
Topic: youtube videos
Posted: Wednesday, November 18, 2009 9:43:06 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_0aEovfaMk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ItU7_XfuxpU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b0U_c6MrGwE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A64c8XjceUo

Doug Stowe
Director Wisdom of the Hands at Clear Spring School
Author of books and articles for Taunton Press and Fine Woodworking
http://www.dougstowe.com
blogging at: http://wisdomofhands.blogspot.com
Topic: Hands, tools and expansion of intellect
Posted: Thursday, September 18, 2008 9:29:33 PM
I am leaving on Sunday to present a paper at Helsinki University, and a very condensed version of the paper is available at Fine Woodworking.com:

http://blogs.taunton.com/woodworkinglife?entry=28

The paper is about making tools at Clear Spring School as a means of bringing hands-on activities into all subject areas, 1st through 12th grades.

Perhaps some other woodworking teachers will find it interesting.

Doug Stowe



Doug Stowe
Director Wisdom of the Hands at Clear Spring School
Author of books and articles for Taunton Press and Fine Woodworking
http://www.dougstowe.com
blogging at: http://wisdomofhands.blogspot.com
Topic: Book reviews-Woodworking with, and for kids
Posted: Thursday, July 03, 2008 7:24:40 PM
Mike, thanks for the tip. Getting kids busy woodworking is a challenge that deserves all the help it can get.

Doug

Doug Stowe
Director Wisdom of the Hands at Clear Spring School
Author of books and articles for Taunton Press and Fine Woodworking
http://www.dougstowe.com
blogging at: http://wisdomofhands.blogspot.com
Topic: Book reviews-Woodworking with, and for kids
Posted: Tuesday, July 01, 2008 2:56:06 PM
Getting kids started in woodworking is not rocket science. It is easy. I am reminded of when my wife brought home books on breast feeding, lots of them, and I wondered, how there could be so much to read about something that is so basic in human experience.

But, yes, as we have gotten farther out of touch with our basic human nature, as we have been shifted and shaped and molded to fit society, (Dylan called it "being bent out of shape by society's pliers,") we do need to read a few things. And reading about how to get a kid safely started in woodworking is one of them.

My wife, director of our local Carnegie Public Library brought home a book she had ordered for the library called Woodworking for Kids. I asked, "Is that the one by John Kelsey?" I have been watching for it because John Kelsey was the first editor of Fine Woodworking from the black and white days, and he has become a friend over the years. He had told me he has a new book out and would send it in the mail.

But, no. The book my wife brought home is by Kevin McGuire and published by Lark. With the world's usual coincidence, John Kelsey's book arrived in today's mail, sent to me by John for review. So I will take a few moments to review both. Of course, there will never be a Kid's woodworking book to equal Richard Starr's book Woodworking With Kids. That doesn't mean new books can't actually be better, but for me, Starr's book threw the door wide open. So, I have an emotional connection with that book that may never be duplicated.

Both of these new books, McGuire's titled Woodworking for Kids, and Kelsey's titled Woodworking and in the Kid Craft Series of Fox Chapel Press offer lots of basics. Tools, check. Wood, check. Techniques, check. Projects, check. Both offer enough information to get kids busy... and get parents inspired and confident enough to allow it. Both offer hours of fun and potential for growth. Out of the absolutely amazing number of potential projects, there are some surprising project overlaps. Both offer birdhouses, of course. Both offer rubber band powered boats. Despite the overlap I would buy both. But then, you know I'm a woodworking fanatic.

On the other hand, if I were to buy just one, I would get the one that came in today's mail. Why? The projects in McGuire's book look like they were made by adults. The ones in Kelsey's book are made by kids. You see them at work and you see the kid work imperfections in the photos of the finished work, reminding us what all this is really about. Woodworking isn't about perfection, but it is about fun and it is about growth.

As a teacher I've seen a lot of kid work, and it doesn't need to be up to an adult level of design and crafted perfection to work in the educational best interests of the child. McGuire's book, unlike Kelsey's does a small disservice to kids when he builds and finishes things to a level of precision that kids would not. Parents, far too attuned to the world of manufactured work and lacking in educational discernment may see bent nails as failure, mis-cuts and poor joints as deficiencies. And believe me, they are not. They are the triumphant signs of sincere effort, learning and growth.

John told me he was hesitant to send me his book... that he knew I might have a more critical eye than most reviewers. But, I have both thumbs up... a great book, hands down.
Posted by

Doug Stowe
Director Wisdom of the Hands at Clear Spring School
Author of books and articles for Taunton Press and Fine Woodworking
http://www.dougstowe.com
blogging at: http://wisdomofhands.blogspot.com
Topic: help! need quick project!
Posted: Thursday, May 15, 2008 6:18:34 PM
Wood block printing!

I cut small blocks of 3/4" scrap MDF about 2 1/4" x 3 5/8". We used chip carving tools and small gouges to make wood block prints for use as book plates. Wherever you've cut away won't print, and besides carving tools, you can use hand saws or the drill press to make areas that won't print, either sawing straight lines or drilling holes. Any lettering has to be mirror image, which requires the students to use some brain power. Edges of the block can also be carved away, variously shaped or scroll sawn to take the rectilinear qualities away and creating a more free form shape. Invite the students to reflect on what other tools they have used during the year and how those tools can be used to create surface effects useful for printing.

Sand the surface lightly, then apply an oil finish to form a resist so the ink doesn't penetrate the wood. The blocks can be done in one class period, and printed the next. We used stamp pad ink since we don't have a Hobby Lobby or other craft store nearby. Printers ink will be better. Use a small rubber roller, wall paper roller or similar to apply the ink the block, then lay the paper in place and use the edge of a block of wood or the back of a spoon to press the paper to the block and transfer the ink.

It was fun, introduced the students to printing and woodcarving at the same time. Discuss the qualities of MDF as something that can be compared with real wood, advantages and disadvantages. Cut extra blocks. Some will mess up and some students will want to do more as time allows.

Doug Stowe
Director Wisdom of the Hands at Clear Spring School
Author of books and articles for Taunton Press and Fine Woodworking
http://www.dougstowe.com
blogging at: http://wisdomofhands.blogspot.com
Topic: projects for kids
Posted: Wednesday, February 20, 2008 7:16:07 PM
I have some woodworking with kids projects featured on the Fine Woodworking website. http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/
They just went on-line today.

The idea is to encourage woodworkers to take on the responsibility of introducing new generations to wood working. If there is enough interest, they may publish more.

It is on a pay to view portion of the site, but visitors can get a 14 day free trial.

An earlier article about my woodworking program at Clear Spring School can be found here: http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/SkillsAndTechniques/SkillsAndTechniquesArticle.aspx?id=29548

Doug Stowe
Director Wisdom of the Hands at Clear Spring School
Author of books and articles for Taunton Press and Fine Woodworking
http://www.dougstowe.com
blogging at: http://wisdomofhands.blogspot.com

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